[____reflections]__]_____][

May 12
Permalink
First words of the day: “Čiutė will be here in a short time.”

First words of the day: “Čiutė will be here in a short time.”

Apr 17
Permalink
Posing pre-night swim

Posing pre-night swim

Apr 13
Permalink

Wires

Had a dream that I had all the right wires for everything

Apr 08
Permalink
Mar 29
Permalink
Monte Carlo beach club boardwalk at sunset #abudhabi

Monte Carlo beach club boardwalk at sunset #abudhabi

Jan 12
Permalink

paxxox:

medievalpoc:

heartsalchemy:

medievalpoc:

Peter Lely

Portrait of Elizabeth Murray

England (c. 1650)

Oil on canvas, 124 x 119 cm

[x] [x] [x] [x]

I think I have seen pictures of this before, in high school maybe, but I don’t remember there being a second person before. I seem to remember this image being cropped differently too, which is very disturbing because now that I see the entire painting, the way I remember it being cropped was very clearly and deliberately intended to remove the person holding the tray of flowers.

Since we’re throwing haymakers at the kyriarchy today, I think this is something that we should really be talking about too, because it happens

ALL. THE. TIME.

Level 1: People of Color from Medieval, Renaissance, and other Early Modern European works were often literally painted over in later decades or centuries.

For example: In this painting, Giulia de’Medici (the child) was painted over in the 19th century:

image

Level 2: It was very fashionable in a lot of 17th and 18th century paintings to have a Black servant featured in portraits of very important historical figures from European History.

Honestly? They’re practically ubiquitous. A lot of the very famous paintings you’ve seen of European and American historical figures have a Black servant in them that have been cropped out or painted over.

Those silly stock photos from your American History Professor’s Powerpoint?

Your Professor’s PowerPoint for “George Washington”:

image

image

The actual painting:

image

image

Your professor’s Powerpoint on Jean Chardin:

image

The actual painting:

image

PowerPoint on Maria Henriette Stuart (with some commentary about the Habsburg jaw):

image

Actual Painting:

image

But, because of whitewashed history curricula, teachers and professors continue to use the cropped images because they don’t want their lecture to get “derailed” by a discussion about race.

These images are also more commonly seen on stock photo sites, including ones for academic use.

I honestly can’t find anyone really writing about this, or even any analysis on how often the cropped photos are used.

The reason they are so easy to crop out is because of the the artistic conventions which reflect the power hierarchy:

Oil paintings of aristocratic families from this period make the point clearly. Artists routinely positioned black people on the edges or at the rear of their canvasses, from where they gaze wonderingly at their masters and mistresses. In order to reveal a ‘hierarchy of power relationships’, they were often placed next to dogs and other domestic animals, with whom they shared, according to the art critic and novelist David Dabydeen, ‘more or less the same status’. Their humanity effaced, they exist in these pictures as solitary mutes, aesthetic foils to their owners’ economic fortunes.

This is drastically oversimplified, but at least it addresses it directly.

If anyone knows more on any studies or statistical evidence on this tendency, feel free to add it.

(via ourafrica)

Permalink

(Source: sak74, via ourafrica)

Dec 17
Permalink
theinsidesource:

"For me, life has either been a wake or a wedding." - Peter O’Toole (1932 - 2013)
Take a peek at O’Toole’s history of films, stills, and posters on eBay. 
(Photo courtesy of aintitcool.com. Text by Jenny Bahn)

theinsidesource:

"For me, life has either been a wake or a wedding." - Peter O’Toole (1932 - 2013)

Take a peek at O’Toole’s history of films, stills, and posters on eBay. 

(Photo courtesy of aintitcool.com. Text by Jenny Bahn)

Jan 10
Permalink
theinsidesource:

A Queer Collage 
First brought to our attention by London-based graphic designer and illustrator, Joanna Zawazdzka, the collages of Deger Bakir made an indelible impression. His twists on scale and form are remarkable and arresting, warped and beautiful. Arms reach out of cityscapes, withered legs traipse along carpet-like wallpaper, celebrities of yore kiss against artificial backdrops. Deger’s work feels almost as though surrealist Salvador Dali and cubist Pablo Picasso got together with some old magazines and scissors and went to work on a collaboration, the kind of arts and crafts project dreams are made of.
(Photo courtesy of Deger Bakir. Text by Jenny Bahn)  

theinsidesource:

A Queer Collage 

First brought to our attention by London-based graphic designer and illustrator, Joanna Zawazdzka, the collages of Deger Bakir made an indelible impression. His twists on scale and form are remarkable and arresting, warped and beautiful. Arms reach out of cityscapes, withered legs traipse along carpet-like wallpaper, celebrities of yore kiss against artificial backdrops. Deger’s work feels almost as though surrealist Salvador Dali and cubist Pablo Picasso got together with some old magazines and scissors and went to work on a collaboration, the kind of arts and crafts project dreams are made of.

(Photo courtesy of Deger Bakir. Text by Jenny Bahn)  

Jan 06
Permalink